Statistics on physical dating violence in college students

Please note that comparing between studies may be unwise as many do not use the same methodology in measuring violence.

Much of this field is still understudied, especially when it comes to violence perpetrated against members of historically marginalized groups.

Penn State’s Gender Equity Center (Gen EQ) supports students who have been impacted by sexual violence, relationship violence, stalking, harassment, and other campus climate issues.

Gen EQ staff provide education, advocacy, referrals, and crisis intervention/support counseling.

We have provided data for non-student survivors in order to provide insights into the elevated violence these groups face.

A lot of domestic violence focus is on adult relationships, yet the most common age in which intimate partner violence first occurs is 18-24 years old for both women and men.

Dating abuse ranks dead last on a list of topics parents most commonly discuss with their teens: school/grades (95%), money (90%), the economy (83%), family finances (78%), dating relationships (72%), alcohol (71%), drugs (71%), sex (64%) and dating abuse (31%). 52% of college students know someone in an abusive relationship yet only 8% see it as a major campus problem and many don’t intervene for the following reasons: think it will make the matter worse (62%), feel it is not their business (60%), think it will hurt their relationship with the victim (60%), they know the abuser (56%), and afraid the abuser might make their life more difficult (56%). Conducted by Knowledge Networks, (December 2010), “College Dating Violence and Abuse Poll”. Conducted by Tru Insight, (June 2009), “Teen Dating Abuse Report”.

Teens often think some behaviors, like teasing and name-calling, are a “normal” part of a relationship.

For women, the next most common age is 11-17 years old.

Kids are most likely to talk about it with their friends rather than their parents, so if you are a parent make sure to read these articles about Children and Teen violence.

Despite this, we hope this resource offers a useful overview of what we know about gender-based violence and some numbers to communicate powerfully about the need to address sexual violence on campuses across the United States.

There are significant gaps in the research surrounding the prevalence of violence perpetrated against students who identify as LGBTQ, people of color, disabled, and undocumented even though Title IX’s protections against discrimination apply to all students.

Search for statistics on physical dating violence in college students:

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These statistics are provided to assist survivors, advocates, and researchers in accessing recent data around gender-based violence.

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  1. Here you are, single again, but this time with children. I would also advise that you let your ex-husband know you are introducing someone to your children. It’s not just your life; it’s your kid’s lives too. You should introduce him as a friend and give your children the chance to get to know your guy in a fun, relaxed, no pressure atmosphere. My son actually liked my boyfriend so much he wanted to call him dad.

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